Public open space in Glen Eira

“Glen Eira has the lowest amount of public open space as a proportion of their land area of any Victorian Municipality (4.7%), with Stonnington second with 6.7% and Boroondara third with 9.6%."Victorian Environmental Assessment Council Melbourne Metropolitan Review 2010”
Open space Per capita

 
“Based on a per capita analysis Glen Eira has 1.4 hectares per 1,000 people, Stonnington 1.8 and Boroondara 3.6 Ha per 1,000 persons. The average across Melbourne is 17.9% as a proportion of open space to total land area, or 7.0 Ha per 1,000 persons.” Victorian Environmental Assessment Council Melbourne Metropolitan Review 2010

The facts on Glen Eira public open space speak loudly of what a shortfall we have. By any standards our 1.4 hectares per 1,000 people is a long way behind the Metropolitan Average of 7.0 Ha per 1,000 persons. This open space shortfall has many implications for residents in Glen Eira, now and for the future. The Melbourne Metropolitan Review predicts that Glen Eira's public open space will decline due to population increase.

State Framework and Parkland Code

 
“The State Planning Policy Framework and the Parklands Code apply to open space on public land. Both state that there should be no long-term reduction in open space area, and where a reduction in open space must take place, it should be replaced with land of equal or greater size and quality. This aims to ensure that public open space cannot be diminished without a proper public process, and replacement with land of equal or greater quality. An example of the application of clause 12.05 and the code is the Royal Children’s Hospital. A new hospital is being constructed in Royal Park adjacent to the existing facility. The existing hospital is to be demolished and its site is to become part of the park to replace land used for the new hospital.” “Victorian Environmental Assessment Council Melbourne Metropolitan Review 2010
 
Incremental loss of open space
 
Open space can also be reduced in area by new building works. A common instance is where an addition is required to an existing public building in a local park. This may not be seen as a significant loss, although in municipalities with a low level of open space, incremental losses of this nature can have an impact.” Victorian Environmental Assessment Council Melbourne Metropolitan Review 2010 |