GOON SQUAD: THE ART OF CHARLES
        BURNS

This site is dedicated entirely to the horrific yet beautiful, nostalgic yet weird work of artist Charles Burns.

Cover of Goon Squad
                                Cards
Goon Squad Card Set
Molemen
                                thumbnail
Other Art
Cover of
                                Comics Journal
Comics Journal Interview
Black Hole
                              book cover
Black Hole
EXPLICIT! NSFW!
The
                            Hive cover
COMING SOON - The Hive

July 10, 2013 - Update. After years of inactivity, I have resumed updating this page. There is a new image under "Other art", and a great collection of "Black Hole" pics. All newly-added pics are being scanned at a higher resolution. The Hive pics should be up soon!

THIS IS A FAN PAGE... I ONLY DID IT BECAUSE I LIKE BURNS'S WORK. ALL THE PICTURES ARE SCANNED FROM BOOKS AND COMICS I OWN.

If you like this page, perhaps you might also be interested in the other tribute page I've created, for Melbourne artist Howard Arkley, although VERY different from Charles Burns!

WHY I LOVE CHARLES BURNS
If you haven't thought of comics as being the type of medium where you would find powerful, frightening, personal and moving works of art, Charles Burns will turn you around.

I think he is a genre artist, and horror is the genre he works in. But his comics are so personal, so deeply instilled with archetypal concepts of guilt, childhood, adolescent sexuality, and poignant, nostalgic portrayals of post-war America, that he transcends genre. He is not just a great comics artist, but a great artist in any medium.

I first encountered Burns's work in the pages of Raw. I bought Raw #5 from The Land Beyond Beyond, a wonderful Sydney shop which I often frequented in the early 80s

Much of Burns's early work seems to come right out of 50s and 60s America. In particular it draws on the horror comics and television programs of that time, combined with a strong autobiographical feeling.

His masterwork, Black Hole, jumps forward to the 70s. The morality tales of Big Baby are replaced with the more frightening ghouls which associate themselves with teenage sexuality.

And The Hive takes Burns's world of psychological horror and sexual intensity and molds it in the shape of a Tintin adventure.



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